It Seems Like Such a Simple Word- Mom

mothers-day-greeting-card-2010-3

I stood in the card aisle of the  store every year searching for a Mother’s Day card.  Mother’s Day cards were always hard to buy. Pictures of children with a beautiful mother or one of those mom’s who did everything and wore the Super Mom Cape filled the aisles. Written in verse on the inside were phrases like “You’ve always been there for me”, or “You taught me so much”, and “I love you.” On the front, were big bold letters that declared “For My Mom” or “Mother.” I would finally settle on a rather generic card with a picture of puppies or flowers that read “Happy Mother’s Day-Hope you have a wonderful day.”

I don’t remember much about my mother before she left my brother and me.  I was only four years old. She left me with her mother and my brother was sent to live with my father’s parents. She came back to visit and stayed with us a couple of times after she left, but by the time I was six, she had moved across the county.  I didn’t see her again until I was 16. Letters and phone calls were all that kept us connected, but my grandmother only allowed one short call a week. I think she would have been happier if my mother had just disappeared altogether.

For a while, Grandmother would look at me and say, “I love you” in a way that let me know she was waiting on the proper response. I wouldn’t look at her, but I would respond with, “I love you- But I love my other Momma, too.”  I had to call my Grandmother, Momma. She told me I didn’t have to call her that, but I knew better. So, I did my best not to call her anything. I would walk across an entire room to get her attention and ask a question, so I didn’t have to say “Momma.”

I didn’t understand what had happened or why my mother left until I was grown. In an old trunk of Grandmother’s, I found the note my mother wrote the day she left. Scrawled on small, yellowed, unlined paper, you could feel the pain and panic of her words .  “Please take care of the kids.  I love them more than anything in the world, but they are better off with you. I guess you think I am awful for leaving the kids like this. Me and Joe just can’t get along. I tried to talk to him, but it’s no good. It’s just not good for the kids with me and Joe fighting all the time and him drinking. Please don’t turn them against them. I don’t know if I’ll see them again, but tell them I loved them an awful lot.”   My mother was not only leaving an abusive, alcoholic husband, but was leaving behind her young two children; She had just turned 20 years old.   What I soon learned was that he was not only abusive to her, but to me as well.  She was afraid my brother and I would be hurt if she stayed.

As an adult, I tried to have a relationship with my mother, but it was hard.  She walked away from me so many times; usually for a man.  When my first son was born, she was to come to my house to stay for a few days to help.  Instead she left home and never showed up at my house.  Her husband kept calling me looking for her.  I didn’t hear from her for  three days.  She used my son’s birth as a way to  have time to leave her husband for  her new boyfriend. You get the idea?
 

She was used to shutting people out. She had been hurt by so many for so long. She once told me that she had spent most of her life running away from anything she thought might hurt her.  Many people considered her to be a “hard” woman.  She didn’t take anything from anyone.  However, If you got to know her, you would find that she would go out of her way to help a friend, yet keep her distance emotionally.

I could never bring myself to call her Mom or Mother, but I didn’t want to hurt her feeling by calling her by her given name, so just as I had when I was a child with Grandmother, I tried not to call her anything. Not long before she passed away, I took a trip with her to the place she grew up. She told me stories from her life that helped me understand the pain that made her the woman she was. When we returned from the trip, we sat down to talk before I left for home.  As I was getting ready to leave,  for the only time I can ever remember, she told me that she had always loved me. She paused and said, “You know that, don’t you?” I smiled, took a deep breath,  and said, “Yeah, I know that.”  I gave her a hug and walked to my car.  I took a few steps, stopped and turned back to her.   I said the words that have always come so hard for me.  “I love you,  <PAUSE >  Mom.”   It was the last time I would ever see her. She passed away four months later.

After she passed away, her husband wrote and said, “You were her daughter and she was so proud of you. You meant more to her than you will ever know. She wasn’t good at telling people she loved them, but you were the heart of her joy before I met her and still so to the end. Her greatest joy was being your Mom.”

*I wrote about my mother in another post here.

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4 thoughts on “It Seems Like Such a Simple Word- Mom

  1. Oh my goodness. This is such a vulnerable post. I know you speak for many, many people with strained and sometimes completely severed relationships with their moms. I appreciate you sharing such a deep experience with yours.

    Until my mom was diagnosed with brain cancer, I had a tough relationship with her. I was hurt by her, and resentment built layer by layer, year after year…

    The mom wound is a tough one to heal. I’ve found that becoming a mom myself is helpful. I get to be the kind of mom I wish I had, and I have a better understanding of the struggles my own mom faced.

    Thank you, again, for sharing your heart. What a gift you have.

  2. I remember meeting Claudia (your mother) when I lived in Reno. She was a character alright. This was a good story for me for mother’s day this year. hHave a good mother’s day!

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